Social Responsibility & Quality Performance

Social Responsibility & Quality Performance

To ensure we get the best clinical results for our patients, Adventist Health White Memorial uses seven performance measures to chart our progress.

Patient Safety & Clinical Excellence

Patient care is the heart of our mission – our reason for being. Keeping our patients safe is our number-one priority, so much so that it is woven into our workplace culture as our first guiding principle: "I will take personal responsibility to ensure the safety of patients, co-workers and all others I come into contact with while at work.

This promise is truly essential to every action we take. From the highest levels of the organization to individual patient care at the bedside, our commitment to patients is grounded in our faith-based heritage and our relentless pursuit of excellence. For this reason, we pay special attention to our patients' physical, emotional and spiritual well-being, and we encourage them to participate with us in their care.

But creating a safe environment and ensuring excellent clinical outcomes for every patient does not happen by chance. It requires an intentional and dedicated effort by physicians, hospital staff, patients and visitors. We strive to maintain a culture of safety and a focus on excellence through communication, compassion and a shared sense of accountability. When we work together, we can provide the highest quality care with dignity and respect for all patients.

Creating a Culture of Safety

A good way to define the patient experience is to think of it as “the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care” (the Beryl Institute). Critical to the understanding and application of this definition is a broader explanation of its key elements:

  • Interactions: The orchestrated touch-points of people, processes, policies, communications, actions, and environment
  • Culture: The vision, values, people (at all levels and in all parts of the organization) and community
  • Perceptions: What is recognized, understood and remembered by patients and their primary caregivers. Perceptions vary based on individual experiences such as beliefs, values, cultural background, etc.
  • Continuum of Care: Before, during, and after the delivery of care

To help shape the patient experience, we rely on the HCAHPS survey (see the section below on Patient Experience) to improve our public accountability in health care by increasing the transparency of the of hospital care provided in return for the public’s investment in our services.

The Patient Experience

A good way to define the patient experience is to think of it as “the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care” (the Beryl Institute). Critical to the understanding and application of this definition is a broader explanation of its key elements:

  • Interactions: The orchestrated touch-points of people, processes, policies, communications, actions, and environment
  • Culture: The vision, values, people (at all levels and in all parts of the organization) and community
  • Perceptions: What is recognized, understood and remembered by patients and their primary caregivers. Perceptions vary based on individual experiences such as beliefs, values, cultural background, etc.
  • Continuum of Care: Before, during, and after the delivery of care

To help shape the patient experience, we rely on the HCAHPS survey (see the section on Patient Experience) to improve our public accountability in health care by increasing the transparency of the of hospital care provided in return for the public’s investment in our services.