Ambulatory Equipment

The tools you need to lead a healthy life

Adventist Health Sonora offers a wide variety of ambulatory equipment to improve mobility for a higher quality of life. From canes and crutches to walkers and wheelchairs, we have everything you need to complete daily tasks and lead an independent life.

Canes

  • The single-point cane has a length of wood or aluminum tubing with a handle used to steady a person's gait. The length is related to the person's height. The cane must fit the client at the correct hand height from the ground when the person is standing.
  • The quad cane has four rubber-tipped prongs extending from an adjustable aluminum staff. This cane provides more stability than a regular straight cane. The small-base quad cane is used by clients who need support and who can climb stairs. The large-base quad cane is used by clients who need more support and who are unable to climb stairs.

Crutches

  • Underarm crutches are lengths of wood or aluminum tubing joined in a narrow "V" shape. The wide end is padded and fits in the underarm of the client. These crutches are usually used as a pair to support the weight of someone with an injured leg or foot. The size and length of the crutch is related to the standing height of the client.
  • Forearm crutches are lengths of reinforced aluminum tubing topped with guides for the client's forearms. The client passes their hands through the guides and grips the handles affixed to the tubing. These are crutches are usually used to steady the gait of a person with a neuromuscular disease or birth defect.

Walkers

  • The adjustable folding walker has an aluminum tubular frame with four adjustable legs to accommodate the client's height. The walker has handgrips to aid the client, who positions themselves into it, gaining three-sided support while stepping forward.
  • The four-wheeled rolling walker has an aluminum tubular fame with adjustable legs to accommodate the client's height. The walker has handgrips and brakes to aid the client. The walker has a seat allowing a client to sit when needed. To use the walker, the client positions themselves it, gaining three-sided support while stepping forward.
  • A folding-wheeled walker is similar to the folding walker except it is equipped with wheels. This feature allows a person to glide if they aren’t strong enough to lift the walker.

Wheelchairs

  • A standard wheelchair has nonremovable, full-length arms, footrests (usually adjustable) and wheel locks. It will generally accommodate clients 5 feet 5 inches to 6 feet tall weighing 110 to 200 pounds.
  • A hemi-wheelchair has a lower seat than the standard wheelchair. This allows a person to propel with their feet. This wheelchair is used by people not tall enough to be able to place their feet on the ground while in the chair.
  • A lightweight wheelchair is lighter than the average standard wheelchair and is used by people who lack the upper-body strength to propel himself or herself in a standard wheelchair.
  • A transport chair is similar to a wheelchair, but the user cannot self-propel and can only be pushed by the companion. Thus, the transport chair is both lighter and more compact than a wheelchair.
  • A heavy-duty (or bariatric) wheelchair is used by people who weigh more than 250 pounds.
  • A reclining wheelchair has a high back, a headrest and an extension. The back reclines to various degrees.

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