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Hospital Promotes Diabetes Alert Day March 22

General

"My name is Amanda, and I am a newly diagnosed person with diabetes as of January 10, 2011. I was craving and drinking water constantly. I thought I had the flu. My husband convinced me to seek medical attention. My blood sugar was 496 when a normal blood sugar doesn't usually get over 140. Now I am learning how to live with diabetes and how to make healthy choices for myself because I'm worth it! Diabetes is a part of my life, but it doesn't define who I am. So I'm choosing to eat balanced meals, take my medication, and exercise…because I want more years with my husband and family. Because I'm worth it!"

Diabetes is a serious disease that left untreated can lead to deadly complications. 24 million Americans have diabetes and 57 million more are at risk for diabetes. If current trends continue, one in three American adults will have diabetes by 2050. You could be at risk.

March 22, 2011, is Diabetes Alert Day. Tillamook Hospital encourages you to "Join the Million Challenge" by being one of a million people taking the diabetes risk test to find out your risk for developing diabetes. The test asks simple questions about weight, age, family history and other potential risks for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. This free test is available in English or Spanish online or by telephone at 1-(800)-342-2383, by texting JOIN to 69866 (standard data and message rates apply) and on display in the hospital's front lobby.

Tillamook Hospital offers support and education that help those with diabetes enjoy the best health possible, including:

  • DIABETES & ALL THAT JAZZ: A free support group meeting on the second Tuesday monthly that features a short presentation on a diabetes-related topic.
  • LIVING BETTER WITH DIABETES CLASS: A 4-session class providing in-depth information about diabetes to those diagnosed with diabetes.
  • DIABETES AND YOU: A free one-day seminar held each Fall highlighting some of the latest developments in diabetes care and prevention.

Speakers from the hospital are also available to give free presentations to the community about diabetes, its risks and ways to prevent it. For more information, please call diabetes program coordinator Sue Phillips-Meyer at (503)-815-2443. You are worth it!