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Master Chef Parvinder S. Bali Provides Training for Dietary Services Staff at Howard Memorial Hospital

Nutrition

Parvinder S. Bali Provides Training for Dietary Services

Staff at Howard Memorial Hospital

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: July 29, 2009

Contact: Anthony Stahl
Director HR/Marketing
Howard Memorial Hospital
(707)-456-3101

 

Willits - During June and July, the Frank R. Howard Memorial Hospital Dietary Services staff was trained by Chef Parvinder S. Bali, master chef visiting from Kashmir, India. Chef Bali is among the top 80 chef's in the world.

Jim Eldridge, Food Services Supervisor from HMH, met Bali at a conference in New York. "Bali was there with two other chefs from India. They didn't want to drive because in India, they drive on the opposite side of the road," said Eldridge. "Since I was from New York, I drove them around and showed them the sights. Bali said if he could ever do anything to repay me, just to let him know."

Eldridge called Bali not long after the conference and asked if he would be willing to come teach the HMH nutritional service staff. Bali was agreeable, and seven months later, he arrived to provide world class training.

Bali currently works in New Delhi with Oberoi Hotels, one of the finest hotel companies in the world. Each hotel has 12 to 15 food and beverage outlets. They have their own butcheries and gardens. There are specialty restaurants, including Chinese, Thai, American and Indian food in each hotel, along with 24-hour cafes.

Bali taught the staff multiple skills. First on the list: knife skills. According to Bali, knife skills are very important. Each vegetable and fruit needs to be cut correctly for maximum yield; the correct knife and chopping style will allow for maximum yield. It is also important to make each cut the same size. 

Bali showed the staff how to make food look attractive. They practiced with fruit platters for banquets. The staff also learned how to make stir-fries, Indian food and different methods of cooking.

"I believe half of patient healing comes from good food and nice presentation," said Bali. "We need to get away from the 'hospital food' mentality. The food should look as good as it does from a fine dining restaurant." Bali's goal: every patient should think "make me sick for a day"because the hospital food is so good.

Bali started his career as a mechanical engineer. After a year as an engineer, he decided to work in the hotel business so he could go to medical school. While working at the hotel, Bali fell in love with cooking. He took three years of schooling, six months of which was an internship. Soon after, he was recruited by Royal Hotels. 

Bali took two more years of post graduate studies and on-the-job training. He worked in every kitchen, from pastry to oriental to banqueting. He also learned about managing, finance, food control, how to deal with people and the cultural mix involved with cooking for large groups. Bali is now one of 80 master chefs worldwide.

- During June and July, the Frank R. Howard Memorial Hospital Dietary Services staff was trained by Chef Parvinder S. Bali, master chef visiting from Kashmir, India. Chef Bali is among the top 80 chef's in the world. Jim Eldridge, Food Services Supervisor from HMH, met Bali at a conference in New York. "Bali was there with two other chefs from India. They didn't want to drive because in India, they drive on the opposite side of the road," said Eldridge. "Since I was from New York, I drove them around and showed them the sights. Bali said if he could ever do anything to repay me, just to let him know. "Eldridge called Bali not long after the conference and asked if he would be willing to come teach the HMH nutritional service staff. Bali was agreeable, and seven months later, he arrived to provide world class training. Bali currently works in New Delhi with Oberoi Hotels, one of the finest hotel companies in the world. Each hotel has 12 to 15 food and beverage outlets. They have their own butcheries and gardens. There are specialty restaurants, including Chinese, Thai, American and Indian food in each hotel, along with 24-hour cafes. Bali taught the staff multiple skills. First on the list: knife skills. According to Bali, knife skills are very important. Each vegetable and fruit needs to be cut correctly for maximum yield; the correct knife and chopping style will allow for maximum yield. It is also important to make each cut the same size. Bali showed the staff how to make food look attractive. They practiced with fruit platters for banquets. The staff also learned how to make stir-fries, Indian food and different methods of cooking. "I believe half of patient healing comes from good food and nice presentation," said Bali. "We need to get away from the 'hospital food' mentality. The food should look as good as it does from a fine dining restaurant." Bali's goal: every patient should think "make me sick for a day" because the hospital food is so good. Bali started his career as a mechanical engineer. After a year as an engineer, he decided to work in the hotel business so he could go to medical school. While working at the hotel, Bali fell in love with cooking. He took three years of schooling, six months of which was an internship. Soon after, he was recruited by Royal Hotels. Bali took two more years of post graduate studies and on-the-job training. He worked in every kitchen, from pastry to oriental to banqueting. He also learned about managing, finance, food control, how to deal with people and the cultural mix involved with cooking for large groups. Bali is now one of 80 master chefs worldwide.