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The Doctor Is Always In - Hospitalist Program Now at TCGH

General

If a hospital stay is in your future, don't be surprised if you're cared for by a new kind of doctor--a hospitalist. Tillamook County General Hospital (TCGH) has begun employing hospitalists, the fastest growing specialty in medicine.

Q: What do hospitalists do?
A: Their sole responsibility is to care for hospitalized patients from admission to discharge. Typically hired directly by hospitals, these doctors practice exclusively in the hospital, ordering appropriate diagnostic tests, monitoring your condition and providing you with the best possible care until you are discharged to your regular health care provider.

Q: What if I have my own health care provider?
A: If you have a primary care provider, the hospitalist works very closely with him or her to monitor any major changes in your condition and to determine when you are ready for discharge. If you do not have a primary care provider or are admitted to the hospital through the emergency room, a hospitalist will be assigned to your care.

Q: What type of medical training do hospitalists receive?
A: More than 90 percent are trained in internal medicine, a specialty dealing with acute health problems such as congestive heart failure, pneumonia, diabetes, digestive problems and other problems common among hospitalized patients.

Q: How will I benefit from hospitalist care?
A:
 Hospitalists are readily available to keep a close eye on you and can follow up on tests promptly and respond quickly to emergencies. Because they are in the hospital throughout the day, they can spend time discussing concerns with you. "Patients are simply better off when their doctor is able to look in on them several times a day," says Larry Davy, CEO at TCGH. "And the time you stay in the hospital is often shorter." Because a hospitalist is in charge of the care of patients in the hospital, your main doctor will have fewer interruptions and be more available to you in the clinic.

Q: How does this benefit the hospital and providers?
A: More than 100 published studies show that employing hospitalists reduces the risk of medical errors, shortens hospital stays and lowers hospital costs, which are advantages for both the hospital and you. Additionally, the 24/7 demand that has been placed on rural providers has challenged our ability to recruit new physicians to Tillamook. The hospitalist position now opens up the possibility of recruiting and improving the retention of health care providers in our community.If a hospital stay is in your future, don't be surprised if you're cared for by a new kind of doctor--a hospitalist. Tillamook County General Hospital (TCGH) has begun employing hospitalists, the fastest growing specialty in medicine.

Q: What do hospitalists do?
A:
 Their sole responsibility is to care for hospitalized patients from admission to discharge. Typically hired directly by hospitals, these doctors practice exclusively in the hospital, ordering appropriate diagnostic tests, monitoring your condition and providing you with the best possible care until you are discharged to your regular health care provider.

Q: What if I have my own health care provider?
A:
 If you have a primary care provider, the hospitalist works very closely with him or her to monitor any major changes in your condition and to determine when you are ready for discharge. If you do not have a primary care provider or are admitted to the hospital through the emergency room, a hospitalist will be assigned to your care.

Q: What type of medical training do hospitalists receive?
A: 
More than 90 percent are trained in internal medicine, a specialty dealing with acute health problems such as congestive heart failure, pneumonia, diabetes, digestive problems and other problems common among hospitalized patients.

Q: How will I benefit from hospitalist care?
A:
 Hospitalists are readily available to keep a close eye on you and can follow up on tests promptly and respond quickly to emergencies. Because they are in the hospital throughout the day, they can spend time discussing concerns with you. "Patients are simply better off when their doctor is able to look in on them several times a day," says Larry Davy, CEO at TCGH. "And the time you stay in the hospital is often shorter." Because a hospitalist is in charge of the care of patients in the hospital, your main doctor will have fewer interruptions and be more available to you in the clinic.

Q: How does this benefit the hospital and providers?
A:
 More than 100 published studies show that employing hospitalists reduces the risk of medical errors, shortens hospital stays and lowers hospital costs, which are advantages for both the hospital and you. Additionally, the 24/7 demand that has been placed on rural providers has challenged our ability to recruit new physicians to Tillamook. The hospitalist position now opens up the possibility of recruiting and improving the retention of health care providers in our community.